Motorcycle Club » The Motorcycle Rant

Wake up call #2 Another passing rant

23 posts from 18 voices
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  1. MigejCojode
    #

    This is a rant more at myself than anyone else. 2 near misses in little over a week. Wake the hell up Coyote.

    Here's a quick run down on what happened:

    I was riding staggered behind a buddy (Doc). We were doing a little passing but not really over the speed limit unless we were passin. He pulls out to pass a car, no traffic coming, a corner approaching but still enough distance to pass, just. Problem is he wasn't passing he was yelling at the guy in the car ahead for throwing a butt out the window (hey I've done it, but never in the opposing lane).

    That's where the problem started. The 650 needs a little windup to do a "safe" slingshot and keep up with the big boys. So when he started passing I dropped a gear and gave it throttle. By the time I figured out he wasn't passing but pulling back in I was moving and had to come on the binders hard. The back wheel locked up (newer, harder compound tires that I hadn't done a skid test with). I then went into a skid first left side out then fishtailed right side out then left again before the rear tire finally took hold again. At one point my left curb feeler did it's job.

    I kept it upright because of 2 things, years of dirt bike experience and the grace of the Higher power. I'll keep the religious context short to avoid arguments but I swear I could feel His hand on my head just when I thought I'd lost it.

    Lessons learned:

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  2. Doc isn't always passing. My fault for assuming so.
  3. Locking up the brakes is bad. When changing tire brands give them the 100 kms to wear off the demolding compound then test your braking ability (these had 1500 kms and I hadn't done that yet)
  4. in a skid Point the front tire in direction of travel and let off the offending tire. (I actually did that but the back tire had lost traction enough that the down shift kept it locked up)
  5. If you are going to loose it let the bike bleed as much speed as possible, the slower you hit the ground the better you chances of surviving.
  6. in 50 meters there is lots of time for you to think: things like "I'm not wearing enough leather for this." "this is gonna hurt." "did I kiss my significant other before I left?" "I'm not gonna make it for work tonight."

  7. But the ultimate lesson: Slow down, keep your eyes open, remain focused and ride safe. I got off lucky, again, all it's gonna cost me is a new tire.

  • kamezbanger
    #

    Glad you are ok. That is a lot of rubber left on the road!!!!

    This sport is not for the weak hearted....that is for sure.

  • TerrjB
    #

    So what your saying is, the new tires are now broken in?

    glad you came out of it all right and with little new knowledge.

  • Goadlocger69
    #

    Glad you made it thru unscathed, except for that minor heart attack .
    Thanks for sharing, hearing incidents like this help all of us stay focused.

  • MigejCojode
    #

    A quick update the Dr is going to surgically remove my underwear from my anus later next week.

    Thanks for the sentiment all.

  • Driwetapisnezz
    #

    Hi Mikey:

    A new tire and a new pair of shorts...not too bad of a deal considering the alternatives.

    I don't much care - you have every right to acknowledge the hand of God - may He continue to bless and protect you and all our compatriots on this Board - even those who don't recognize Him.

  • Shebhertezz
    #

    [*] in a skid Point the front tire in direction of travel and let off the offending tire. (I actually did that but the back tire had lost traction enough that the down shift kept it locked up)
    Glad you're OK! Thanks for taking the time to share this lesson learned with us.

    Question: I have heard and read that when you lock a front tire to release it immediately; when you lock a back tire, keep it locked til you come to a stop - otherwise risking a high side.

  • retzdaret
    #

    Mikey, be careful my friend. There is only room for one wounded moderator on this forum and I have that spot filled for the time being.

    Glad your all right. So how does that tire look now. Is there a big flat spot?

  • quicgmicg
    #

    A quick update the Dr is going to surgically remove my underwear from my anus later next week. Thanks for the sentiment all.
    Holy crap...the hair was standing up on the back of my neck as I read that. Glad you are OK, man....

  • MigejCojode
    #

    Actually the tire is not to bad. The hard compound of those Kenda Cruz stood up well (it's that same hard compound that helped put me in that situation). I'm gonna have it run over the balancer and if it can balance out without a bar bell attached to one side it will ride out what I have left of summer. Either that or burn it off until it's round LOL.

  • zhovman
    #

    Burning it back round would be a whole lot more fun than pulling it off and mechanically balancing it-JUST SAYING. Glad you made it through without dropping your bike.

  • zliter
    #

    Glad you came out of it okay, besides the shorts that is. I noticed while reading that you seemed to keep your wits about you and did not panic. Panic is one of those things that will get a good rider into trouble quick and turn a scary situation into a disaster.

    Glad you're OK! Thanks for taking the time to share this lesson learned with us. Question: I have heard and read that when you lock a front tire to release it immediately; when you lock a back tire, keep it locked til you come to a stop - otherwise risking a high side.
    Shebhertezz, that is more in theory and you have to access each situation as it happens. Sometimes keeping the rear locked will actually cause you to go down. It just depends on what is happening and how the bike is reacting to your controls or attempt to control. Main thing to remember is to keep calm and don't panic and be able to "read" the bikes actions.

  • flakkerbhil
    #

    Glad you came out of it okay, besides the shorts that is. I noticed while reading that you seemed to keep your wits about you and did not panic. Panic is one of those things that will get a good rider into trouble quick and turn a scary situation into a disaster. Shebhertezz, that is more in theory and you have to access each situation as it happens. Sometimes keeping the rear locked will actually cause you to go down. It just depends on what is happening and how the bike is reacting to your controls or attempt to control. Main thing to remember is to keep calm and don't panic and be able to "read" the bikes actions.
    Absolutely. Last week I was going down the road looking for a dealer I'd never been to before. As I was coming around a curve going about 45mph, there it was. I jumped on the rear brake thinking I had plenty of time to slow down...wrong. The rear wheel locked up and kicked out to the right! I came off the brakes, but it was still right, left, right...eeep! eeep! eeep! I had enough time to think, "This is going to hurt."

    Somehow, though, I got the bike back, slowed down and pulled into a parking lot about a half block down from the dealer.

    Stupid, stupid, stupid! And lesson learned. I STILL don't know how I got the bike back!

  • tunc
    #

    bet its not the only skid mark that was in that spot (undies) as well
    bet ya ended up with a flat spot on the tyre after that mikey

    glad all ended up ok

  • mhcruizer
    #

    Glad you came out of it okay, besides the shorts that is. I noticed while reading that you seemed to keep your wits about you and did not panic. Panic is one of those things that will get a good rider into trouble quick and turn a scary situation into a disaster.
    Always had the ability to "let it ride" when I got in trouble. I know the tires will grab again so I always make sure I stay in a postion that will be good for grabbing when they do. I have never been down but was sideways many times on my crotch rockets 20 years ago. Luckily I am older and wiser and rarely sideways now. Panic is not an option unless you know you are going to hit something hard.

    Great "hold-on" Mikey.

  • ykramnedvurxned
    #

    They used to teach to keep the rear brake applied until you stop but it is now taught to release the rear brake until you reach the point of impending skid. For the front brake you should immediately release and properly reapply. Remember that the threat that was out in front of you is still there and you need to scrub the speed.

    I have taught both ways over the years of teaching motor officers and I practice braking as well as threshold braking often. Remember that the front brake holds more than 70 % of your braking and knowing where the threshold is will save your life some day as it has saved mine.

    I hope this will help someone as we all need every advantage that we can get.

  • micg10
    #

    glad your okay Mikey. i applaud you for keeping a calm head! just goes to show you, experience counts!
    stay safe brother.

  • 4mrAkankmpr
    #

    Your braking description sounds alot like mine weeks after I started riding again, when I started to gun it to make a red light, only to see a cop car at the intersection. Like you, I felt the intervention of a higher power in recovering from that miscalculation. I also recently almost found out the hard way that those big hunks of styrofoam that pack electronics don't explode when you hit them-front tire hit it and jumped @ 1' to the side. 89 degrees out and I felt a sudden chill!

  • MigejCojode
    #

    I appreciate it the kudo's guys. But the calm head is just another gift I can't take credit for. If I had a truly calm head I wouldn't have put myself in that situation to begin with.

  • wdvinpop
    #

    A quick update the Dr is going to surgically remove my underwear from my anus later next week. Thanks for the sentiment all.

    glad to hear you did well now on the underwear, I'll bet there tighter then Joan rivers face, might take awhile

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