Motorcycle Club » Vstar 950

vibration

10 posts from 9 voices
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  1. nabaricg
    #

    I ride an V4 Honda Magna and am trying to decide which star to get the 950 Tourer or 1300 Tourer. I am mostly concerned with vibrations while at freeway speeds. Vibrations cans finger numbness. The local dealers won't allow test rides. The 950 does not have a counter balancer and was wondering if there is much vibration. The 1300 has balancers but I don't really need that big of a bike. I am 5'6" and the 950 is about the same size as my Honda. Has anyone rode both bikes? Also how often do you check valve clearances? Wish they had hydrolic lifters. I ride about 8,000 miles a year. Thanks for any info.

  2. Mondj
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    Haven't experienced any vibration on the 950T at all. Only problem I have had is wind turbulance. Check Buck's lowers which is supposed to eliminate the majority of the buffeting. I'm ordering some as members say it works. Good luck on your decision.

  3. SkdMige
    #

    I ride an V4 Honda Magna and am trying to decide which star to get the 950 Tourer or 1300 Tourer. I am mostly concerned with vibrations while at freeway speeds. Vibrations cans finger numbness. The local dealers won't allow test rides. The 950 does not have a counter balancer and was wondering if there is much vibration. The 1300 has balancers but I don't really need that big of a bike. I am 5'6" and the 950 is about the same size as my Honda. Has anyone rode both bikes? Also how often do you check valve clearances? Wish they had hydrolic lifters. I ride about 8,000 miles a year. Thanks for any info.
    The engine on the 950 is so well engineered that it doesn't require a counter balancer. If you get one you'll be surprised how smooth it is.
    Valve clearance is checked every 16,000 miles

  4. TheGoltj
    #

    I haven't noticed any vibration on the 950 at freeway speeds. It's a very smooth ride. I would definitely recommend buying a set of Buck's lowers ( buckslowers.com/ ). The buffeting without them is terrible, but with them it's nice and calm behind the windshield.

    The valves only need to be checked/adjusted every 16,000 miles, unlike the 1300 which is still at every 4000 miles.

  5. 1wzdar320
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    Vibration is not much of an issue. Unless you really buzz the engine there is not much to notice. At highway speeds ( 75 - 80 or so ) it is not really noticeable. Most of the vibration is felt in the floorboards. But they have thick rubber whiskers on the bottom side that soak up most of the bad stuff. On mine, the left bar is more active than the right, but just noticeable. With a 60 degree V, no counter balance shaft, and solid mount engine, I am surprised that they don't vibrate much worse.

  6. JozhH
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    Vibration is not much of an issue. Unless you really buzz the engine there is not much to notice. At highway speeds ( 75 - 80 or so ) it is not really noticeable. Most of the vibration is felt in the floorboards. But they have thick rubber whiskers on the bottom side that soak up most of the bad stuff. On mine, the left bar is more active than the right, but just noticeable. With a 60 degree V, no counter balance shaft, and solid mount engine, I am surprised that they don't vibrate much worse.
    I agree. The only vibration I have noticed has been in the floor boards at speeds in excess of 75 MPH. I have never felt any vibration in the grips. It is a really smooth ride. It cruises really nicely at about 60.

  7. peertuge
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    Like others have said at interstate speeds you will feel some slight vibration in the floorboards, i have never had a issue with hand vibration even with still using the stock grips. If the dealer your looking at wont let ya test ride one find one that will.

  8. VTvinChic
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    I have to respectfully disagree. While the 950 is an phenomenal bike, its status as a Tourer doesn't cross much into the true "tourer" territory, but rather a bagged cruiser. The 1300 does indeed have significantly less vibration than the 950 at freeway speeds (own and ride both), and if the bulk of your 8,000 miles are freeway or long days, you will become more quickly fatigued on the 950. The 1300 is a more efficient tourer, whereas the 950 is more around town and occasional freeway. After 500 miles or several hours of 70mph+ (bike speed), I could keep riding on a 1300, but am ready to hit the sack as soon as I can get off the 950. Other factors to consider are the wind and road conditions - the 1300 is a heavier bike and the rider will be jostled around less by wind gusts and rough roads. However, the heft of the 1300 does have its disadvantage for local riding.

  9. Shebhertezz
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    I have no problem with vibrations - handlebars or floorboards. And I have exisiting problems with Carpel Tunnel and Tennis Elbow - a generally bum right arm. I do mostly highway riding. Have no problems keeping up with my husband's 1300. My problems stem more from ergonomics so I am getting pullback/risers and Kury Iso Grips to resolve that. Unlike VTvinChic, I can ride all day. I wonder if the difference has to do with height, ergonomics, and other fit on the bike. But also unlike VTvinChic, I haven't ridden a 1300 so her opinion probably carries more weight....

  10. VTvinChic
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    Shep, the fit couldn't be any better with the new seat, grips, risers and lowers. It's just pure engine vibration from higher rpms that cause distress after long rides or high speeds. The 650's suffer terribly from this, and that's why I upgraded. Compared to the 650, the 950 is butter, and the 1300 is pure silk or sex on wheels (if smoothness is your thing). Bigger displacement engines generally have lower rpms.

    I forgot to add that, like Shep, the 950 has absolutely no problem keeping pace with the big bikes - it just takes a little more wrist action to do so.

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