Motorcycle Club » Vstar 950

Tie Down Straps??

8 posts from 3 voices
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  1. dveag29
    #

    Built a 4'x8' trailer for hauling around any 1 of my bikes and for general use.

    I bought some eyebolts rated at 500lbs each and ratcheting tie down straps rated at a 400lb working load (900-1300lb break strength). With my Hyosung and Yamaha I feel pretty safe with this. But the 950 as at least 200lbs on those bikes. Will the straps be sufficient?

    I will be using a "cradle" type of front wheel chock (you drive into it and the rear brace swings up to cradle the back of the tire as well) if that makes a diffrence.

  2. MorkKW
    #

    Hey, Tweak.

    Those straps absolutely should be fine without a worry. Using that type of wheel chock, if I'm understanding corrrectly its style, you'll ideally want to secure it with 4 straps, all in a forward position. I also add 2 more straps to the rear of the bike in a rearward position. This is the most effective way to secure a bike with a locking type of wheel chock and eliminates any chance of the bike's rear tire lifting up in an unforeseen type of situation.

    Be well.
    Morg

  3. dveag29
    #

    Thanks!

    This is the type of chock I will be using:

  4. MorkKW
    #

    We have 3 of those identical Harbor Freight chocks on our trailer that we use for hauling 3 baggers to NC each year. Those H-F chocks work very well. We use 4 straps on each bike, however, whenever I use my own enclosed trailer (with a Condor chock), I use 6 straps - 4 forward and 2 rearward. I realize the 4 forward would be fine 99.9% of the time, but it's just a "me" thing as I generally error on the side of caution. : )

  5. ylvrikhd
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    This may not apply with an enclosed trailer, but some of the cheaper straps don't have any UV protection and the sun will render them useless in short order. I am building an airplane and had some of the components hung from Harbor freight straps. The sun came through a window on one of the straps. One morning I heard a crash in the shop and found a very expensive part lying on the concrete floor beat up pretty bad. I could pull the straps apart with my hands.

  6. dveag29
    #

    This may not apply with an enclosed trailer, but some of the cheaper straps don't have any UV protection and the sun will render them useless in short order. I am building an airplane and had some of the components hung from Harbor freight straps. The sun came through a window on one of the straps. One morning I heard a crash in the shop and found a very expensive part lying on the concrete floor beat up pretty bad. I could pull the straps apart with my hands.
    Well, the straps are not from Harbor Freight. Not really worried about sun exposure either as I figure they will rarely get used for more than a day at a time perhaps a few times per year.

    That being said, how long were your straps exposed to sunlight? Had to be quite a while if they rotted from sun exposure.

  7. ylvrikhd
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    Probably an hour or two each day for a couple of months. I've had other straps that laid around in the back of a pickup for months in the rain and sun and still held up well. I'm not knocking Harbor Freight as I have bought things from them that were a great value for the money. I had no idea that some straps had UV protection and others didn't.

  8. MorkKW
    #

    Hey, JL.

    Over the years, I've never had the type of fraying you've experienced. Tie-down straps are inexpensive, therefore, I do choose the better and slightly heavier duty ones. Regardless of which ones I have, I also certainly won't leave them lying around outside, but instead keep them inside away from the elements when not being used, no differently than with any other types of tools, or equipment.

    Take care.

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