Motorcycle Club » Star 1100 Classic & Custom

no air, no ais

15 posts from 8 voices
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  1. 21crasj
    #

    I was doing a little looking around on the web concerning disabling the a.i.s. on 1100 vstar and ran across a site (brazil mission) that described a method I had not seen on this site. You remove the left side cover on the bike(hides tool bag etc) and the a.i.s. system box is there and you simply remove the connection which is a 2" section of hose from the fitting and plug it and the fitting. Article says the a.i.s. needs air to work and this procedure effectively disables the system by eliminating any air into the system. Author said it works well. Has anyone seen or tried this method. IF this worked well, it leaves the system looking stock. This site also sells a ram air kit to adapt your stock air cleaner to flow better( on ebay), has anyone tried these also?

  2. yzcoodermac
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    Yeah , the mechanic at the dealer where I puchased my bike suggested rerouting the lines back to themeselves or plugging the larger lines with 2 marbles and using small plugs on the pump.and a rivet or golf T on the small line.I had mine done this way but you will get some black crap that collects in your exhaust I believe from excess condensation.I've also got my rear baffles removed.There are some reports that doing this on 07 and later models could result in a fire from the catalytic converter getting too hot. I never had this problem and had it disabled for about 2 months,altough as I said you will get the black crap that will leak out on your nice chrome exhaust.I dont know what a factor the baffles being removed plays in the cats getting hot. It seems to me that this would help the exhast run cooler.
    Mac

  3. LiddleBen
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    The AIS is simply an air injection system that is sort of a pollution control. It's main purpose is to help rid the system of any unburnt fuel for cleaner combustion, I diabled mine as you described. and the lines filled with condensation. Later I did the complete removal with the head plugs from PCS.

  4. lorzpan
    #

    I was doing a little looking around on the web concerning disabling the a.i.s. on 1100 vstar and ran across a site (brazil mission) that described a method I had not seen on this site. You remove the left side cover on the bike(hides tool bag etc) and the a.i.s. system box is there and you simply remove the connection which is a 2" section of hose from the fitting and plug it and the fitting. Article says the a.i.s. needs air to work and this procedure effectively disables the system by eliminating any air into the system. Author said it works well. Has anyone seen or tried this method. IF this worked well, it leaves the system looking stock. This site also sells a ram air kit to adapt your stock air cleaner to flow better( on ebay), has anyone tried these also?
    Old thread, but I just wanted to inform those interested that I more or less followed the No Air, No AIS principle by plugging the air intake of the system. But, I didn't do it like presented there, I plugged the intake hose from the air box of the AIS and not the AIS intake since I didn't have a suitable plugging material.

    That said, it worked and there's no more backfiring/popping on decel, blipping or anything.

    This method is also easier to revert to normal because all I have to do is remove the little plug in the hose and that's it. Unlike what's prescribed where you have to put the 2 inch hose back on or you un-loop the hoses on another method.

  5. bkman
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    Quote:
    This method is also easier to revert to normal because all I have to do is remove the little plug in the hose and that's it.
    True enough - this is definitely easier (and cheaper) than a complete removal. The only potential issue I know about is the eventual rotting of the AIS lines. The research I did on this all indicated that these lines will eventually collect enough acidic water vapor to rot the lines from the inside out. You won't notice the problem until the chrome starts to bubble. How long this takes really depends on how much you ride (I would suppose), but I ride a lot so I didn't take the chance.

  6. Sduplyumbr
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    After removing mine I would suggest just removing the whole works. It only took my an hour and the plugs are about $30.00, so it is quite an inexpensive mod. It is also very simple so don't be afraid.

  7. bkman
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    Also, I forgot to mention earlier that everyone I communicated with about this told me not to ever disconnect the AIS if the stock exhaust was still on the bike. I believe this is only an issue on catalyst bikes (the later models with catalytic converters) but I may be wrong.

  8. lorzpan
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    True enough - this is definitely easier (and cheaper) than a complete removal. The only potential issue I know about is the eventual rotting of the AIS lines. The research I did on this all indicated that these lines will eventually collect enough acidic water vapor to rot the lines from the inside out. You won't notice the problem until the chrome starts to bubble. How long this takes really depends on how much you ride (I would suppose), but I ride a lot so I didn't take the chance.
    Yeah, that's what I've heard as well. I'll observe it and get back to you guys.

    If it gets bad, I'll probably go for the full removal of the AIS.

  9. lorzpan
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    Update:

    I followed bkman's suggestion and removed the AIS, must say it was pretty easy. Although, I did have problems with the rear since there's so little space to work with (removing that damn AIS line in the rear is like working on some puzzle). But, otherwise about 30 mins to an hour is all that's required.

    Anyway, for anyone with this popping/backfiring issue, the method highlighted on this thread is probably the best DIAGNOSTIC step to take before actually going through with the complete removal procedure.

    Tip: If you don't have any vacuum plugs, you can do what I did and use appropriately sized bolts to plug the tubes (AIS air intake, carb connection tube), along with some appropriately sized hose/tube clamps.

  10. 21crasj
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    I was the originator of this thread, and I also just removed the whole system once I saw it would not take much time or effort. I just used the silicone and correct size bolts instead of the aftermarket plugs. Works great, no backfiring popping or whistles.

  11. yajparoo
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    So, did this cure the tweet-tweet sewing machine sound comming from the engine?

  12. lorzpan
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    "Sewing Machine sound?"

    I haven't heard that from my bike with or without AIS. Can you describe it further? When do you hear it (at what speed)?

  13. bkman
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    I think he may be referring to the jetsons-car-like whiny sound that is inherent to the 1100 engine (and a few other Yamaha's I've heard).

    If this is yajparoo's specific complaint, let me say that this sound has nothing to do with the AIS. It is just part of the V-Star 1100 soundtrack. If you don't like it, you have three options. Buy a different bike, get a loud exhaust or wear earplugs (the last two options don't completely eliminate this noise, by the way).

    The ticking noise can be controlled by keeping your valves adjusted properly, and by your choice of motor oil (the synthetics seem to quiet things a bit) but the Jetson's car whine is inherent to the engine design and (to my knowledge) can not be eliminated.

  14. yajparoo
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    That's exactly what I was referring to, bkman, thanks for the info. Louder pipes it is, 'cause I love the bike, the ride, the riding position, the power, etc... Just a really good bike.

  15. yy45daco
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    Dont feel bad I didnt like it at first either but I got use to it and it doesnt bother me now.

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