Motorcycle Club » Star 1100 Classic & Custom

battery woes

18 posts from 11 voices
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  1. tunc
    #

    i know for the millionenth time probably
    any idea what the life is of the battery ,mines about 3yrs plus and startin to not hold a charge
    link me to another thread/post if there is one about this

  2. MigejCojode
    #

    There are a few posts on this but it doesn't hurt to revisit it. I've got the original battery in my 99 650, it's lasted that long more through luck than anything else. There are a few things you can do to make it last longer:

    Never let it freeze, bring it in for the winter, store it insulated on cardboard or rubber matting, and charge it. I don't do the tender thing, it gets 1 day on the automatic charger once a month.

    Ensure your charging system is up to snuff. When the battery voltage reaches 12.7 volts (actually closer to 12.68.....) you should have no amperage going in or out. That's really hard to verify without proper shop tools but there are shops out there that can test it for you for a fee.

    What I think has made my battery last so long is where the luck comes in. I do occassionally run it down by accident (part of the weak 650 charging system and forgetting to take my ginko-biloba) about once a year I end up bump starting it in a parking lot because I have only been doing short runs or I left the key on. Then it comes home, charges near 10 amps to start on the auto charger overnight, when I wake up in the morning it's down to less than 2 amps and it's fine.

    Lead acid batteries are prone to battery memory, they become used to only using part of their available power. The theory is that the part of the plates that make the power to start stay clean while the rest just corrodes over. When the battery is brought near dead then recharged all off the plate surface area gets a fresh start, lenghtening the life of your battery. (I'm not sure but I believe it's called sulfation)

    What's that mean for you? If your battery is well taken care of and you are sure of your charging system and If you are sure your battery is going south again and likely going to replace it (therefore nothing to loose) you can try draining the batteries charge and then recharging it. Connecting an old headlight to the battery and leaving it for a few hours will do it, leaving you key on will do it, whatever. Then you can connect it to an autocharger (I swear by these things) and hopefully wake up a lazy battery.

    One thing tho, if your battery is shot this will likely finish it so it's your call. Good luck.

  3. Jonezpoj
    #

    In the warmer climates like here just ride it every day. My 02 has the original as did my 98 when I sold it.

  4. orpie
    #

    My 04 Silverado 1100 has its original battery. My wifes 03 Honda Shadow has its origina battery. I just clean and make tight the connections ( about once a year) and ride alot. They both start like new.

  5. tunc
    #

    thanks all for the info will try a few and see how it goes or get a new one i spose

  6. quicgmicg
    #

    As stated above, there are a million things that aid in the demise of a battery. Heat is one thing that really effects battery life. It seems that the warmer the climate, the shorter the life of the battery. Here in Arizona we can get 3-5 years out of a battery usually, but there are times when they won't even last that long. If you do a lot of riding on rough terrain, that can hurt you too. I guess it's just another one of those "crap shoots" when you buy one. Make sure it has a fairly current date code and hasn't been sitting on a shelf for years.

    Stay cool!

  7. rzchafer2
    #

    Wow, I wish I was a bit more knowledgeable on these things. My battery is on the bike and in the unheated garage. Temperatures for the last couple days has not been over -10F! The garage will be somewhat warmer, as it is insulated, but I dare say, not above freezing.

  8. quicgmicg
    #

    Just slip a trickle charger on it on those cold nights. That'll keep it warm and toasty.

  9. tunc
    #

    quicgmicg its summer over here 30+c bout 86 f but i have taken note of your advice
    maybe its got to go in the fridge

  10. tunc
    #

    update
    bought a new battery solves all probs think maybe just a bad one who knows with a battery anyway all goin fine
    thanks for input guys
    cant be the cold its a heat wave over here at moment //and no i not rubbin it in either

  11. poppj
    #

    i live in california...my v star and car and truck batterys last about 7 or 8 years...i am able to ride my 1100 v star 12 months out of the year...i have never had to charge it...the longest the bike ever sits is 2 weeks...bob

  12. placgzdar30
    #

    Quote:
    Lead acid batteries are prone to battery memory, they become used to only using part of their available power. The theory is that the part of the plates that make the power to start stay clean while the rest just corrodes over. When the battery is brought near dead then recharged all off the plate surface area gets a fresh start, lenghtening the life of your battery. (I'm not sure but I believe it's called sulfation)
    I tried this the last couple of days and it worked! Battery would not crank the bike over. Thought what the hell,nothing to lose I'll give it a shot.Ran the battery all the way down ,charged it overnight, put it on the bike the next day and it fired right up! That kinda stuff NEVER happens for me. This place is a wealth of information. Thanks to all who take the time to share their expertise

  13. MigejCojode
    #

    Glad it worked for ya. Like you said you had nothing to loose.

  14. tunc
    #

    you had a win i just got a battery
    easy way out lol

  15. ModoHero
    #

    Here's a link to a real neat type of battery (dry-cell) that puts out high level power almost till its dead then it drops off. A regular lead acid will diminish at a straight downhill rate getting progressively weaker. The dry acid can be brought back easily and stores well if unhooked. There's a ton of research out there and much more technical info than I can provide. Anyway they work great and no leaking or checking etc. Supposed to be a step above the fibreglas mat batteries. As usual the price varies and the internet was about the same as my local discount cycle shop.

    odysseybatteries.com/index.htm

    Dwayne

  16. bkman
    #

    Quote:
    Just slip a trickle charger on it on those cold nights. That'll keep it warm and toasty.
    Just be careful charging a lead-acid battery indoors. The "sealed" ones, no doubt, are probably much safer but the chemical reaction used to create Voltage is the same. I would imagine that, like their wet cell ancestors, even the sealed "dry" batteries still vent some Hydrogen gas when the battery is charging. With a trickle charger, you'd probably not get enough to ever be a concern, but just be careful.

  17. gklasier1623
    #

    I just put a new starter relay in my 2004 V Star 1100 Custom, and it still will not start. I had a trickle charger on it all winter too. When I go to push the starter button, I get a clicking noise under the driver's seat. So, I replaced the starter relay - that was what was clicking. It still clicks. Could it be the starter or the battery or even something else? I don't have a way to put a load test on the battery. I am the second owner, and I do not know if this is the original battery or not. Any ideas as to what could be the problem are appreciated. Thanks.

  18. MigejCojode
    #

    I just put a new starter relay in my 2004 V Star 1100 Custom, and it still will not start. I had a trickle charger on it all winter too. When I go to push the starter button, I get a clicking noise under the driver's seat. So, I replaced the starter relay - that was what was clicking. It still clicks. Could it be the starter or the battery or even something else? I don't have a way to put a load test on the battery. I am the second owner, and I do not know if this is the original battery or not. Any ideas as to what could be the problem are appreciated. Thanks.
    That clicking is almost always a dead battery sound. You get enough juice to engage the relay but not enough to turn over. Have a look at the headlight. I bet it dims until almost out, another indication of a bad battery.

    Guys trickle chargers are as useless as a screen door on a submarine. Given cooler storage conditions a battery will loose more than one can put out. A battery tender will work slightly better but it doesn't have the ability to give the battery a full charge from dead. Get yourselves a good 10A max automatic charger. They charge at full capacity on a dead battery and bring the amperage down as the battery "fills" and get you moving from a dead battery in as little as a couple of hours.

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